Salmagundi library movie night : Vertigo

Date
Feb 3, 2023 6:00 PM - 8:30 PM
Location
Rockwell gallery
Sponsor

Salmagundi Library Committee

Admission
Open to the public
Eventbrite RSVP required
FREE to attend
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John Ferguson and Judy Barton, played by James Stewart and Kim Novak, embrace

About the Movie

The premiere Salmagundi library movie night is a screening of Alfred Hitchcock’s 1958 masterpiece, ‘Vertigo’. Starring James Stewart as a detective afflicted with a fatal fear of heights and Kim Novak as an alluring and haunted woman who holds the secret to a terrifying mystery. Filmed on location in San Francisco in sumptuous technicolor and scored by the great Bernard Hermann, Hitchcock employs a rich palette of vivid color to create a visual experience that has been universally hailed as one of the greatest American films of all time. Amateur sleuths take note- the roller coaster script leads to a shocking twist ending that only the most eagle eyed might see coming before the big reveal.

About Salmagundi Library Cinematic Beauty Night

Cinephiles, film connoisseurs and people who just love classic movies unite for an evening of timeless cinematic beauty. This continuing series showcases the work of directors who possessed a particular eye for stylish aesthetic and gorgeous composition. While some directors used film to create high intellectual art and others exploited the medium for mere thrills, Salmagundi Library Movie Night presents the rare geniuses who gave us both.

There will be free popcorn and a cash bar with food for sale. Each evening will feature a film introduction by Michael Fetherston.

Still Hungry?

Salmagundi members are welcome to reserve for dinner via our Reservations page. Please be aware that last seating is at 8:30 PM.

About Michael Fetherston

Michael FetherstonMichael Fetherston is a New York City based fine artist by day and film enthusiast by night. Growing up in Manhattan’s East Village, Fetherston regularly attended the legendary revival ‘Theater 80 Saint Marks’ where he fell in love with classic cinema. Great directors have often looked to painters as inspiration for composition and design and he believes that painters might learn something from the best auteurs in return.